Loading...
Remove Text Formatting

Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Conventional Oil Vs. Synthetic Oil

  1. #1
    Club Sponsor Amsoil Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Georgetown
    Posts
    884

    Conventional Oil Vs. Synthetic Oil

    Some basics on Conventional Oil vs. Synthetic Oil.

    It is generally accepted that synthetics outperform conventional oils, but many people don’t understand why. The differences begin at a molecular level.

    Conventional lubricants are refined from crude oil. Contaminating elements such as sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen and metal components such as nickel or vanadium are inherent to crude oil and cannot be completely removed through the refining process. The oil refining process separates the various types of molecules in the oil by weight, leaving molecules similar in weight but dissimilar in structure.

    Synthetic lubricants, on the other hand, are chemically engineered to form pure lubricants. Synthetic lubricants contain no contaminants or molecules that don't serve a designed purpose. They are made from molecules that are saturated with a higher percentage of carbon- hydrogen bonds, leaving fewer sites to which other, harmful molecules can attach and attack the molecular composition of the oil. In addition, their smooth, uniform lubricating molecules slip easily across one another.

    In short, synthetics' versatility and pure, uniform molecular structure impart properties that provide better friction-reduction, optimum fuel efficiency, maximum film strength and extreme-temperature performance conventional lubricants just can't touch.

    •Better wear protection
    •Excellent fuel economy
    •Outstanding extreme-temperature performance
    http://www.amsoil.com/shop/by-equipm...-truck/versus/

    When you're ready to move up to AMSOIL Synthetic Lubricants, let me know.

    Thank you,

    Ryan
    Ryan Matheson
    Matheson Motorsports
    Call/ Text: (416)688-7670

    Amsoil T1-Certified Independent Dealer
    Amsoil Home Page

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Stephen06GT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    5,867
    Thanks for the info Ryan.

  3. #3
    Club Sponsor Amsoil Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Georgetown
    Posts
    884
    Motor oil is one of the most important fluids in your vehicle. The purpose of motor oil is to reduce friction and keep a vehicle's engine clean and corrosion-free. Another critical function is to buffer heat from moving parts in the engine. Most motor oils are manufactured from petroleum-based crude oil, which is processed into motor oil.

    Over time, petroleum-based oils will degrade or break down from the heat and pressure inside the engine. As this occurs, the chemical composition of the oil changes and it becomes contaminated. After thousands of miles, petroleum-based oils are unable to protect the engine and must be replaced.

    Synthetic motor oils have a higher tolerance to heat and aging. The performance characteristics of these synthetic lubricants can be custom-designed to exceed the performance limits of petroleum-based motor oils _ and their use can possibly increase the life of your engine.

    What are the advantages of synthetic oil?

    Synthetic oil was developed for high-temperature use in jet aircraft engines decades ago when engineers realized that petroleum-based oils break down and lose their lubricating capabilities when exposed to high heat. Over time, petroleum-based oils began to oxidize and create sludge, leaving damaging residue inside the engine.

    Formulated in a laboratory, man-made synthetic oil doesn't contain the naturally occurring chemicals that break down at high temperatures. It is also manufactured without many of the chemical compositions that contribute to oil oxidation and sludge buildup. Synthetic oil can tolerate temperatures that would burn up petroleum-based oils.

    Synthetic oil performs admirably in heat, but also offers many benefits in extreme cold. Petroleum-based motor oil thickens in cold temperatures, requiring the starter and battery to work much harder to start a cold engine. Synthetic oil is not as affected by low temperatures, and it will flow much easier at engine start-up. As an added benefit, the cold temperature properties allow it to be quickly pumped throughout the engine, offering much improved start-up protection against friction.

    Custom-designed synthetic oils contain many additives. These keep the inside of the engine clean, and add additional engine protection for extended periods.

    Does my vehicle need synthetic oil?

    If your vehicle is turbocharged, used for towing heavy loads, driven on the racetrack, or operated in extreme temperatures, synthetic oil may be beneficial for extended engine life. Each of these harsh operating conditions demand more from your engine and motor oil, and synthetic oil can deliver the needed protection.

    One other reason to consider synthetic motor oil is extended periods between oil changes. Petroleum-based oils generally require replacement every 3,500 to 7,500 miles, depending on service use. Synthetic oils can easily offer double the service life as their chemical composition does not break down over time. Several manufacturers have taken advantage of this and supply synthetic oil in their vehicles from the factory to extend oil-change intervals and extend engine longevity. Check your owner's manual or ask your service advisor if synthetic motor oil may be right for your vehicle or driving style.
    http://autos.jdpower.com/content/con...motor-oils.htm

    I take J.D. Power info with a grain of salt but they do make some good points and expand on the other quote.
    Ryan Matheson
    Matheson Motorsports
    Call/ Text: (416)688-7670

    Amsoil T1-Certified Independent Dealer
    Amsoil Home Page

  4. #4
    Member tulowd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    West end of GTA
    Posts
    2,217
    Not to start an argument, but synthetic is not the answer or better for every application.

    My Fox calls for conventional 20W50 in the PSP stroker motor; Mercon V in the brand new T5-Z and 85W140 in the 8.8 diff, according to the folks that built them: PSP/Paul Silva; Ford Racing and Truetrac/Eaton.

    I wouldn't dream of putting anything else into it; my impression is the newer vehicles are made for it, but the older stuff is happier with conventional lubes.

  5. #5
    Club Sponsor Amsoil Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Georgetown
    Posts
    884
    I looked around a little bit and I couldn't find anywhere that Ford Racing states not to use synthetic. I found they state that it uses Mercon Fluid or Dextron 3.

    I do see that eaton does say that they don't recommend synthetic so I am going to contact them about it to see what they say.

    None of these posts stated that conventional oil is not an acceptable fluid, they state that synthetic outperforms conventional oil. There is no reason that synthetic oil would not do just as good or better than conventional in your engine.
    Ryan Matheson
    Matheson Motorsports
    Call/ Text: (416)688-7670

    Amsoil T1-Certified Independent Dealer
    Amsoil Home Page

  6. #6
    Admin ZR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Toronto, On
    Posts
    33,321
    my impression is the newer vehicles are made for it, but the older stuff is happier with conventional lubes.


    My feeling,
    the older stuff is no happier with conventional lubes, just tend not to see the benefits of syn as opposed to many of the newer rides. If I thought the Cobra wouldn't blow oil filters off at cold start or during warm up (oil pressure is insanely high in the mod motors), would run dino 15w40 vs the 10w30 I use now. Does that make synthetic a bad choice for an owner looking for the absolute max in engine protection, hell no.
    In my experience, T5's are more prone to developing a grind when shifting using syn ATF vs conventional. Suspect the blocker rings loose too much bite with syn in there. Excellent results using Amsoil Syncromesh, have it in a pile of rides including my own. Can't say enough good things about how well it performs.
    Gear lube, with the Eaton or Torsen, your always wise to follow their recommended lubes. In the case of the torsen, dead set on a lube that does not contain any friction modifiers, only one that fit the bill was from Redline. I'd have otherwise opted for Amsoil Severe Gear, luv the stuff.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    3,331
    Ryan , I run an 2012 E250 4.6 pretty hard lots of idling and stop n go , 1200k + at times per week ,any recommendations for oil ?

  8. #8
    Member tulowd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    West end of GTA
    Posts
    2,217
    Quote Originally Posted by Amsoil Guy View Post
    I looked around a little bit and I couldn't find anywhere that Ford Racing states not to use synthetic. I found they state that it uses Mercon Fluid or Dextron 3.
    I called Ford Racing tech line and they specifically said Mercon V is what it was designed for.

    I do see that eaton does say that they don't recommend synthetic so I am going to contact them about it to see what they say.
    I spoke with their tech department, as well as Summit Racings Tech line and they both said absolutely no synthetic. If you read a number of tech blogs and boards, especially from road racing guys using Truetracs, the vast majority who have tried various gear lubes all agree the diff performs best with conventional.

    I ran synthetic Mobil 1 5W50 (?) in my old 306 motor and it spun two rod bearings after a life of 20W50 conventional oil. Paul told me the oil was likely to blame, as it is too thin. My understanding is the bearing clearances are larger/looser, thus requiring thicker film than what synthetic will offer. The motor had app 50 000 km.

    None of these posts stated that conventional oil is not an acceptable fluid, they state that synthetic outperforms conventional oil. There is no reason that synthetic oil would not do just as good or better than conventional in your engine.
    I called Ford Racing tech line and they specifically said Mercon V is what it was designed for.

    I spoke with TrueTrac tech department, as well as Summit Racings Tech line and they both said absolutely no synthetic. If you read a number of tech blogs and boards, especially from road racing guys using Truetracs, the vast majority who have tried various gear lubes all agree these diffs performs best with conventional lube.

    I ran synthetic Mobil 1 5W50 (?) in my old 306 motor and it spun two rod bearings after a life of 20W50 conventional oil. Paul told me the oil was likely to blame, as it is too thin. My understanding is the bearing clearances are larger/looser, thus requiring thicker film than what synthetic will offer. The motor had app 50 000 km.

  9. #9
    Admin ZR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Toronto, On
    Posts
    33,321
    Film supporting the bearing being sufficient or not, was about the 5w oil you ran opposed to the 20w you had been running, not syn vs dino. Had you run a 20w50 full syn, protection level would have been above what the dino oil is capable of.

  10. #10
    Member tulowd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    West end of GTA
    Posts
    2,217
    The bearings went when motor was hot, not cold. If the oil is rated for 50 W then it should have offered the same protection as 20W50 - initial pouring thickness and low temp should be the only differences. My understanding is the difference is not in film strength but film thickness....the synth being smaller and thus able to lubricate better in tighter clearances - at the expense of not filling the gap the same way as conventional.

    Same idea with the noisy Trutrac rear end - replace the synth 75/W140 with a thicker, 85W140 dino oil and noise is reduced significantly; as you know.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SiteUptime Web Site Monitoring Service